The general’s mess



Dear Editor:

Phil Grant’s ludicrous critique of the nation’s governors and translucent coddling of the

Trump administration in “Governors made a big mistake” (April 30) is an excellent example of

monocular intelligence. He blames the captains for losing the conflict while General Trump, who

created the battle plan, is exonerated.

Mr. Grant is more apparent when he states that we should “let people manage their own

behavior relative to C-19…” while chastising liberals for being “pro-choice.” So, choice is fine

when Grant says it’s OK … hubris much? According to this logic, the professor’s pro-life

philosophy must be that we should lock arms and block cemeteries, insisting that there are

other options.

The center section of his piece smacks down the left on the world stage. Grant suggests

that the lefty playbook has shuttered world business. The WHO and CDC have succumbed to

politics. And then Grant subtly suggests this all to take down Donnochio. Methinks Mr. Grant’s

nose may be big and wooden too. He likes suggesting that politics overrides science. Sort of

like suggesting a beached sailboat overrides water.

When one is sailing into a storm, caution seems prudent. Mr. Grant, however, suggests

closing one’s eyes is the best choice. That way, if tragedy occurs, you can rightly say “I didn’t

see it coming.” He suggests “new” and “similar” are the same thing. It would be fun to follow him

around the boatyard while a salesman shows him new 2020 and similar 2001 sailboats selling

for the same price.

Trump recently said he could have been a pro baseball player. When researched, it was

discovered his high school batting average was around .150. Like everything else in the current

administration, Mr. Grant probably thinks that’s good enough to go pro, especially for a

professor who can only bat right-handed.

The current pandemic is uncharted territory, but we won’t fall of the edge of the Earth.

Have the governors made mistakes? As Trump goes, so go the heads of states. With humility

and compassion, most of us will survive. Thriving may have to wait.

Will Cannon

Winter Harbor

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