Commentary

  • Lamoine’s hydrologic disaster

    By Willem Brutsaert, Ph.D. The plan of an out-of-town sand-and-gravel operator, Harold MacQuinn Inc., is to remove the last remaining hill in Lamoine, located adjacent to the largest concentration of homes in Lamoine, near “Lamoine Corner,” an area generally referred to as the center of town. The incipient disaster is remarkably visible by anyone traveling

  • The perfect gift

    The stair rule generated much excitement and consternation growing up. On Christmas mornings, my sister and I were allowed to venture partway down the stairs to peer through the railings at the bounty under the tree. But there was no setting foot on the first floor until our parents were awake. The suspense nearly did

  • The Christmas table

    By Todd R. Nelson   In 11th grade shop class, I worked all fall on a dining room table. It would be a Christmas present for my parents, and a great surprise. My teacher offered me the project based on something he had seen in a woodworking design book — a butcher-block table 5 feet

  • Spending more on debt than defense

    By Mark W. Hendrickson The financial health of the federal government has been deteriorating for decades. Unable to break free from our bipartisan addiction to deficit spending, the national debt has continued to rise relentlessly. This has brought us within sight of a grim milestone: the day when the interest that Americans have to pay

  • School officials tell parents to throw away the yardsticks

    By Rep. Lawrence E. Lockman Is it really “poisonous” for parents to compare student test scores in their local school district to test results in other districts across the state? I don’t think so. But then, I’m not a credentialed education professional with advanced degrees, earning $80K or $90K toiling in the government school monopoly

  • Maine a shining example of the way recounts should be

    By Skip Greenlaw One item on my bucket list is to count election ballots. Lynne Williams of Bar Harbor posted that she had lost an election for Hancock County judge of probate by 57 votes out of 28,972 votes. Lynne asked the Bureau of Elections for a recount, and I offered to be a counter

  • Congress should pass a new farm bill before 2018 ends

    By Anna Johnson Congress has only a few days left in 2018 to pass legislation. Adopting a strong, new farm bill should be at the top of their list. Lawmakers should approve a farm bill that includes closing loopholes in commodity payments, renewing major conservation programs and continuing programs that offer support to rural communities

  • Just more anti-aquaculture propaganda

    Dear Editor: In the 15 years I’ve been in the aquaculture business raising oysters I have yet to read a letter against it that was accurate. Bundy Boit’s letter [“‘State’s relentless pursuit of aquaculture’ is a cautionary tale for the coast of Maine,” Nov. 8, Ellsworth American] was no exception. Her letter is just a

  • Why the Brazilian elections matter

    By J.P. Linstroth On Oct. 28, Jair Bolsonaro was elected as the 38th president of Brazil from the Social Liberal Party, a conservative leaning party. His critics call him the “Brazilian Trump.” Indeed, Bolsonaro’s election is symptomatic of a worldwide trend toward “right-wing populism” and “neo-nationalism,” or popular sympathies favoring political candidates on the far

  • Why the Brazilian elections matter

    By J.P. Linstroth On Oct. 28, Jair Bolsonaro was elected as the 38th president of Brazil from the Social Liberal Party, a conservative leaning party. His critics call him the “Brazilian Trump.” Indeed, Bolsonaro’s election is symptomatic of a worldwide trend toward “right-wing populism” and “neo-nationalism,” or popular sympathies favoring political candidates on the far