Bed Race Prompts Race-y Undercover Fun



Members of the Bar Harbor wastewater division team were totally pumped going into the second annual Bar Harbor Bed Race on Saturday. When it was over, they were flush with victory and the other 10 teams were circling the drain.

 

The Unflushables, a team of five determined competitors from the Bar Harbor wastewater division, proudly took home the first-place title and a prize of $500 in chamber of commerce gift certificates during the second annual bed races in Bar Harbor on Saturday, with the fastest time of 36.94 seconds. Twelve teams signed up, and four showed up to compete in the race. A section of Cottage Street downtown was closed off for the competition, which followed the town’s annual Pajama Day sale and parade. See related story and photos on page 1 of section 3 of this week’s Mount Desert Islander, and more photos at www.fenceviewer.com.—ROB LEVIN
The Unflushables, a team of five determined competitors from the Bar Harbor wastewater division, proudly took home the first-place title and a prize of $500 in chamber of commerce gift certificates during the second annual bed races in Bar Harbor on Saturday, with the fastest time of 36.94 seconds. Twelve teams signed up, and four showed up to compete in the race. A section of Cottage Street downtown was closed off for the competition, which followed the town’s annual Pajama Day sale and parade. See related story and photos on page 1 of section 3 of this week’s Mount Desert Islander, and more photos at www.fenceviewer.com.—ROB LEVIN

The wastewater team, calling themselves The Unflushables, completed the Cottage Street course, from the Criterion Theatre to Main Street and back, in 36 seconds flat on their first run. In the runoff against teams with the second and third fastest times in the first heat, The Unflushables were nearly one second slower than their first time, but that was good enough to claim the $500 first prize. The Jackson Lab team was awarded $250 for finishing second. A team of local students sponsored by Window Panes got the satisfaction of finishing third.

A large, enthusiastic crowd cheered on the teams. Each team consisted of five people, with one of them sitting or lying in the bed – and holding on for dear life – while the other four pushed or pulled.

The Unflushables’ bed, though fast, was not exactly a thing of beauty. Its only “decorations” were a toilet seat on the front and a plunger on each corner. Other beds in the race were creatively tricked out, and some team members wore costumes worthy of the Fourth of July parade. The rider in the Jackson Lab bed was dressed as a two-headed laboratory mouse.

Then there was the Mount Desert Island Hospital obstetrics team, which incorporated a dramatization of labor and delivery into their race performance. Normally, during a delivery, it’s the doctors and nurses who are urging the patient to “push harder!” But for the maternity-themed race team, it was the other way around.

Obstetrical nurse Mary Glass, lying in bed and pretending to be in labor, exhorted her teammates – two other OB nurses and two physicians – to get her to the finish line as fast as they could. After they crossed the line, team member Dr. Mary Dudzik reached under the bedclothes and drew out a “newborn” baby doll.

While the obstetrics team, whimsically calling themselves Pushing a Head, was long on theatrics, they turned out to be somewhat short on speed. They had the seventh best time among the 11 teams in the race, running the course in 42.22 seconds.

Pushing a Head suffered a near calamity during a practice run in the hospital parking lot last Thursday evening when one of the bed’s wheels rolled over the left foot of team member Dr. David Painter. He wasn’t seriously injured, but he walked with a limp for a while.

Following the practice session, team members took the bed to a friend’s garage and spray-painted the frame pink and baby blue. They returned Friday morning to finish the decorating job, adding infant hats, mittens and blankets.

Nurse Ellen DaCorte organized the obstetrics team, which included nurse Janice Horton.

Team members wore their hospital scrubs for the race, but they took most of the decorations off the bed before pushing it to the starting line to reduce wind resistance and avoid having tiny hats and mittens flying all over the street.

Although the Pushing a Head team didn’t finish at the head of the pack, they had one of their most memorable deliveries.

“It was so fun,” said Ms. DaCorte. “We’ll be back next year.”

For more community news, pick up a copy of the Mount Desert Islander.

 

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