BAT to Take Flight



SULLIVAN — A piece of Mount Desert Island history has recently been put on the market and the owner, David Cadigan, would like to see it remain in the area where she has spent the better portion of her life.

 

The Luders L-16 sailboat is currently known as BAT, which was her original name when she came to Northeast Harbor as part of the Luders fleet in 1946.

The Luders L-16, BAT, on the far right, has a long history in the area as she came here as part of the original Northeast Harbor Luders fleet in 1946. The current owner, David Cadigan, hates to part with her and would like to see her stay in the area. — STURGIS HASKINS
The Luders L-16, BAT, on the far right, has a long history in the area as she came here as part of the original Northeast Harbor Luders fleet in 1946. The current owner, David Cadigan, hates to part with her and would like to see her stay in the area. — STURGIS HASKINS

Mr. Cadigan learned how to sail when he was in school, and when he moved back to Maine in 1968 he thought it would be fitting to finally buy a boat of his own. An acquaintance, Sturgis Haskins, who many know as the area’s premiere Luders aficionado, steered Mr. Cadigan toward a boat he had seen for sale at the Mount Desert Yacht Yard.

The boat was previously owned by Mount Desert resident Moorhead Kennedy, who had named the boat Djabib, which is Arabic for something that pertains to the seas, according to Mr. Cadigan. Mr. Kennedy was deeply interested in Arabic culture and was one of the American hostages held at the United States Embassy in Teheran, Iran, for 444 days beginning in 1979, and served as the hostages’ spokesman.

One of the conditions of the sale was that the new owner change the name of the boat. “Since Djabib didn’t mean a whole lot to me it wasn’t a big deal,” said Mr. Cadigan. So he renamed the boat Oh, Wow. “That was one of my favorite sayings back then.”

About 15 years ago, Oliver Spear rebuilt Mr. Cadigan’s Luders. Some of the layers were coming unglued below the waterline, which was a common issue for the laminated Luders. “He did a beautiful job moonlighting on his own time. He reglued the laminations and, at his suggestion, put a layer of fiberglass over the laminates, said Mr. Cadigan. “At first I didn’t like the idea. I thought it was going to be a lot heavier. He said it will be a little bit heavier but after a couple of weeks in the water a regular wood boat is going to weigh just as much.”

After Mr. Spear rebuilt it, Mr. Cadigan renamed his Luders the BAT at Mr. Haskins suggestion, because that was its original name.

Interested parties should contact Mr. Cadigan at [email protected] or call 422-3000 for more information regarding BAT.

For more maritime news, pick up a copy of the Mount Desert Islander.

 

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