Environment

  • Beautiful Birds Flock To Islesford

    Post offices are busy places, especially in the morning, but usually it has to do with letters, stamps packages, etc. and patrons catching up on the latest news with each other. Recently on Isleford, however, it was for the birds! I received several calls from the postmistress on the island telling about exciting birds coming to her feeder. They just could not go unnoticed. First were two indigo buntings. Birds with blue coloring are few in the north. These buntings are in the group with grosbeaks, finches and sparrows. Members of this family group can best be identified by their stout and short bills adapted for cracking seeds.

  • World Oceans Day June 8

    NEW YORK CITY — Sixteen years after it was first proposed, the United Nations (U.N.) has notified Oceana of its official resolution to designate June 8 as World Oceans Day. Both the U.N. and Oceana are preparing events to honor the inaugural celebration of the planet’s oceans.

  • World Oceans Day June 8

    NEW YORK CITY — Sixteen years after it was first proposed, the United Nations (U.N.) has notified Oceana of its official resolution to designate June 8 as World Oceans Day. Both the U.N. and Oceana are preparing events to honor the inaugural celebration of the planet’s oceans. The U.N. decision comes after thousands of supporters

  • Turkeys Are Getting Hot To Trot

    Wild turkeys are strutting these days all over the island. Even in busy Southwest Harbor, small flocks of these birds may be seen walking about in their distinctive way. They always make me laugh. It seems that one dominant male is always nearby while the hens with their heads down search for food. Often a few younger males stand nearby. Once in awhile one of them will challenge the dominant male with no success. Male turkeys really know how to impress the ladies. When they fan their tails and do the little “turkey trot” they are very handsome and fun to see. After the male has won his lady and they mate, she all but disappears because the male then becomes a threat to her eggs and young. Her nest must become a well kept secret from him and the babies protected once they have hatched.