Photo by Steve Fuller

Eastbrook residents debate raising or razing old building



Photo by Steve Fuller

Eastbrook Town Clerk Shelly Shaak and moderator Steve Jordan count ballots during one of several closely contested elections during the town’s annual meeting Monday night.

EASTBROOK — Article 24 was something of an anomaly on the warrant at Eastbrook’s annual Town Meeting Monday night.

Among the articles calling for the election of municipal officials and asking for money for everything from animal control to school expenses, Article 24 simply asked for “an open discussion about the Town Library.”

“As you all know, the library is in bad shape,” said First Selectman Tim Dickens, who quickly added selectmen don’t know what to do with the building.

The building is not just any building, either. It is on the National Register of Historic Places, where it is listed as the Eastbrook Town House.

National Park Service records posted online show the building was built sometime in the second half of the 19th century.

Though it’s known now as the town library, residents agreed it hasn’t been used as such for awhile. They shared stories of a building filled with bat droppings and lead paint, and said it was “a hazard to even walk into.”

Residents expressed dismay at having to watch the building “crumple every year,” but also expressed doubt that much could be saved from the building.

Even factoring in moral support for saving the building, residents agreed the expense of doing the work would likely make the effort cost-prohibitive.

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Steve Fuller

Steve Fuller

Reporter at The Ellsworth American,
Steve Fuller worked at The Ellsworth American from 2012 to early 2018. He covered the city of Ellsworth, including the Ellsworth School Department and the city police beat, as well as the towns of Amherst, Aurora, Eastbrook, Great Pond, Mariaville, Osborn, Otis and Waltham. A native of Waldo County, he served as editor of Belfast's Republican Journal prior to joining the American. He lives in Orland.