PHOTO BY JANE CROSEN

Surefire chicken and cherries for summer night



By Jane Crosen

This earthy, fruity chicken teriyaki is a household favorite, an easy, but special stovetop dinner on a hot summer evening. The time to make it is just over the crest of cherry season, when fresh cherries are more affordable. If, like us, you have freshly harvested garlic scapes (those curliquing stalks cut so the plant puts energy into the bulb, not the fruiting body), this is a nice way to use them.

Not all chicken thighs have skin delicate enough to leave on, but Tide Mill Farm’s organic chicken thighs have thin skin too good to waste. With careful skilletsmanship, they’ll provide a crisp golden crust to the chicken, sealing in juices.

If using larger chicken thighs with thicker skin, trim off the fattier edges, leaving the thinnest skin covering the top — or remove the skin altogether, and lightly coat the chicken with flour before frying. You also can use boneless chicken thighs cut in pieces.

Over the years we’ve made this dish various ways — marinating, braising, adding a pinch of ground ginger and cayenne for a little more heat. This is my favorite way, and the simplest.

Chicken with Cherries & Mushrooms
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Courtesy of Jane Crosen
Servings
2 people
Servings
2 people
Chicken with Cherries & Mushrooms
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Courtesy of Jane Crosen
Servings
2 people
Servings
2 people
Ingredients
  • 2 whole chicken thighs bone-in, skin on
  • 1 tsp. butter
  • 1 Tbsp. light olive oil divided
  • 4 small to medium portobello mushrooms sliced
  • ½ small to medium onion large dice
  • 1 clove garlic minced (or 2 garlic scapes, sliced)
  • 2/3 cup fresh cherries pitted and halved
  • 1 Tbsp. tamari
  • 2 Tbsp. dry sherry
  • ½ tsp. dried summer savory or 1 tsp. fresh
  • ½ tsp. dried thyme or 1 tsp. fresh
  • Few grates multicolored pepper
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. Trim any excess fatty skin from the chicken.
  2. Heat the butter and 1 teaspoon of the oil in a large skillet and briefly sauté the mushroom slices on both sides to seal the edges and bring out the flavor. Remove them to a plate.
  3. Add the remaining oil to the pan and add the chicken thighs, bone side down. Fry over medium heat until lightly browned, then turn and brown the top (skin) sides. Turn the thighs with a spatula and repeat until both sides are nicely browned. Remove to the plate with the mushrooms.
  4. Add the onion to the pan and sauté over medium-low heat for a minute or two, then add the garlic (or garlic scapes) and cook until the onion is translucent. Add the cherries and sauté briefly, then return the chicken and mushrooms to the pan, along with the tamari.
  5. Deglaze the pan with the sherry, scraping up browned bits with the spatula. Add the herbs and freshly ground pepper.
  6. Cover the pan and simmer over medium-low heat about 5 to 8 minutes, adding a little water if necessary, until the chicken and mushrooms are done, cherries are tender, and the sauce is somewhat reduced and aromatic.
  7. Serve with tricolor “tweed” quinoa (see following recipe), French couscous, or basmati rice, along with sautéed or braised garden vegetables — onion, zucchini, summer squash, spinach, chard, peapods or a combination.
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Tricolor Tweed Quinoa
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Recipe courtesy of Jane Crosen. This mix of blonde, red, and black quinoa bakes nicely into the simplest of pilafs. As with wild rice in a rice medley, the darker quinoas add interest and texture, and pan-roasting the grains in oil before baking keeps them nutty. Leftover quinoa reheats nicely baked in an oiled pan covered with foil. Or, combine it with fresh summer vegetables in a tabbouleh or other grain salad.
Servings
4 servings
Servings
4 servings
Tricolor Tweed Quinoa
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Recipe courtesy of Jane Crosen. This mix of blonde, red, and black quinoa bakes nicely into the simplest of pilafs. As with wild rice in a rice medley, the darker quinoas add interest and texture, and pan-roasting the grains in oil before baking keeps them nutty. Leftover quinoa reheats nicely baked in an oiled pan covered with foil. Or, combine it with fresh summer vegetables in a tabbouleh or other grain salad.
Servings
4 servings
Servings
4 servings
Ingredients
  • 2 tsps. olive oil
  • 1 cup tri-colored quinoa
  • 2 cups hot or boiling water
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 F. Heat the oil in small (7-by-7-inch) lidded Corningware or other ovenproof baking dish. Add the grains and pan-roast over low-moderate heat for a couple of minutes, stirring constantly, until fragrant and lightly golden.
  2. Add boiling water, cover with lid, and bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Fluff slightly with chopstick or form before serving.
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Jane Crosen of Penobscot is a mapmaker, freelance editor, and author of “Maine Mapmaker’s Kitchen,” together with her husband, Richard Washburn. She is currently working on a second cookbook, “Culinary Landscapes,” to be published next year.