Cider is a versatile ingredient that makes a fine sauce for pork chops, sausages and lamb stew. THINKSTOCK PHOTO

Boiled cider is a versatile cooking ingredient



Boiled cider pie is sometimes called Shaker cider pie. Shakers in New England and the Midwest certainly made cider pies and added boiled cider to the applesauce that they canned and sold commercially. However, this recipe came not from Shakers but from a Unitarian church group in Waterville, which published “Delectable Recipes, Tried and True” as a fundraiser in 1898.

Early in the 19th century, when sugar was expensive, boiled cider was an economical sweetener and flavor enhancer. Any farmer who produced enough apples to make cider could make boiled cider. Because it was not a product of slave labor, it had a special appeal to abolitionists. When the supply of sugar and molasses was interrupted by the Civil War, boiled cider served a substitute for sugar in the North.

Temperance advocates recommended canning boiled cider so that it could be stored without fermenting into hard cider and reconstituted for a beverage when needed.

You make boiled cider yourself by cooking cider down to one-seventh of its volume. Boiled cider is a delectable sweetener and flavoring for cakes, pie, applesauce, donuts and muffins; it also makes a nice topping for pancakes.

Boiled Cider Pie
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This recipe came from a Unitarian church group in Waterville, which published “Delectable Recipes, Tried and True” as a fundraiser in 1898.
Boiled Cider Pie
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
This recipe came from a Unitarian church group in Waterville, which published “Delectable Recipes, Tried and True” as a fundraiser in 1898.
Ingredients
  • 1 unbaked pie shell for an 8-inch pie
  • ¾ cup boiled cider
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsps. butter
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 3 large eggs separated
  • 1/8 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Place the pie shell in an 8-inch pie plate, crimp the edges, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
  2. If you are making your own boiled cider, cook 5¼ cups of cider over medium heat until it is reduced to ¾ cup. At that point the cider will be syrupy. Skim off any foam that appears in the process.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  4. In a large bowl, mix the brown sugar, butter and salt into the warm cider. Stir in the lemon juice. Beat the egg yolks slightly and mix in. Whip the egg whites until stiff peaks form and fold them gently into the filling mixture with a rubber spatula.
  5. Pour the filling into the pie shell and sprinkle nutmeg on top. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until the filling is brown and set. The filling will still wobble when you tilt the pan, but it should not slosh. Do not reheat to serve. This is essentially cider jelly plus a meringue; reheating may make it too liquid.
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Merry Post

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