Chinese Dancer Performs Ancient Dances at Lamoine School



Chiao Bin Huang, who was trained as a classical dancer and choreographer in her native Taiwan, brought a sampling of her culture and history to the Lamoine Consolidated School April 16 with a Chinese dance that dates back to the Han dynasty.

Lamoine schoolchildren first watched a demonstration of the ribbon dance, and then tried it on for size. Dancer Chiao Bin Huang rated the students “five star” in terms of behavior and cooperation.—JACQUELINE WEAVER
Lamoine schoolchildren first watched a demonstration of the ribbon dance, and then tried it on for size. Dancer Chiao Bin Huang rated the students “five star” in terms of behavior and cooperation.—JACQUELINE WEAVER

Chiao Bin Huang, who was trained as a classical dancer and choreographer in her native Taiwan, brought a sampling of her culture and history to the Lamoine Consolidated School April 16 with a Chinese dance that dates back to the Han dynasty.

Award-winning artist Chiao Bin Huang recently traveled from Boston to perform and to teach a workshop on two ancient Chinese dances at Lamoine Consolidated School. She says her mission is to help children and the communities to develop cultural awareness, respect and appreciation.—JACQUELINE WEAVER
Award-winning artist Chiao Bin Huang recently traveled from Boston to perform and to teach a workshop on two ancient Chinese dances at Lamoine Consolidated School. She says her mission is to help children and the communities to develop cultural awareness, respect and appreciation.—JACQUELINE WEAVER
Invited by her former professor at Emerson College in Boston, Carol Korty of Lamoine, Huang’s daylong program of performance and workshops was designed to coincide with the school’s exploration of the Asian culture.

Huang teaches the Chinese language at Carlisle Middle School in Carlisle, Mass., and had no trouble engaging the school’s 114 students over the course of the day. Sharing her culture with American children, she said, is something she sees as her mission.

Korty, who teaches drama at the Lamoine school, is engaging the entire school in a production of her play, “Riding the Wind: Story Plays from Old China,” which will be performed this spring. Huang’s visit coincides with that upcoming production as well.

Huang began with a brief description of the ribbon dance, which began in the Han dynasty. It is based on a well-known story about a man who thwarted an assassination of the emperor by using his sleeve to block the assassin’s sword. The ribbon in the dance represents the sleeve.

For more arts stories, pick up a copy of The Ellsworth American.

Nicole Ouellette

Nicole Ouellette

When Nicole isn't giving advice she's completely unqualified to give, she runs an Internet marketing company in Bar Harbor, where she lives with her husband Derrick and their short dog Gidget. She loves young adult novels, cooking and talking French to anyone who'll talk back. [email protected]