Columnists

  • Sock it to ’em

    Sock it to ’em

    We are nearly out of socks. We have perhaps three pairs between us and our middle-school child. None match. We blame the Labrador, who we’re sure eats socks when we’re not looking. We blame our chickens, who we suspect have snatched socks from the clothesline to fashion tiny scarves and hats for winter. But, it’s

  • The votes are in

    The votes are in

    Did you have, like, a gazillion fruit flies this summer? We sure did. Had to take out the compost three times a day. Finally stowed the fruit bowl in a cupboard. Little brats even came in for a landing in our wine glass a few times. Eww. Speaking of wine: from the start, we were

  • Pouring it on

    Pouring it on

    “I cannot get by without Poppy Seed Dressing, though I’m personally tired of it,” wrote Helen Corbitt in the 1974 book “Helen Corbitt Cooks for Company.” Dog-eared, brown and oil stained, forgotten until just recently, this page in my cookbook has seen almost 40 years of action. Early in my culinary career as a new

  • The wonder of compost

    The wonder of compost

    There ought to be a Sir Albert Howard Day, on which we celebrate the founding of the organic movement. It was that British agronomist and writer, after all, whose work inspired the American author J.I. Rodale to part the chemical sea that had flooded agriculture after World War II and lead so many of our

  • Say cheesecake, lobster that is

    Say cheesecake, lobster that is

    Every month, I have the opportunity to showcase the delicious Maine foods in season and cook a meal for 200 folks. With the help of a dedicated group of volunteers, we source ingredients, most often from island gardeners, farmers and fishing folks, create the menu, and spend a weekend chopping, dicing and prepping for the

  • How sweet it is

    How sweet it is

    Sweet corn is not a great crop for the home garden. It takes up a lot of space and is a hungry feeder. A windstorm can blow it down. Its season is short. And then there are the raccoons, which always know just when the corn is perfectly sweet and tender and show up for