PHOTO BY CHERYL WIXSON

Famed dressing concocted to honor “Green Goddess” actor



Green is the color of spring. On my morning walk around Crockett Cove, I watch the winter grays and browns recede as bright shades of green spring forth; prickly green mounds of moss, chartreuse green tips of new spruce, bright green spears of chives, velvety green leaves of mint and soft green fronds of ferns.

Our eating patterns start to shift as the season changes. The metabolism quickens, and our bodies crave the crunch of more green vegetables, while our palates are eager for a lift after a season of roots.

A finger-licking good recipe that takes full advantage of this luxury of spring green and fresh herbs is the classic Green Goddess Dressing.

Food historians credit the origin of this dressing to San Francisco’s Palace Hotel, where chef Philip Roemer created it to honor actor George Arliss, who was performing in William Archer’s 1923 play “The Green Goddess.” The dressing is bright green (as is the huge green idol in the play), creamy, rich and tangy … addictive really.

Variations of the recipe abound, with the main ingredients being mayonnaise, anchovies, parsley, tarragon and other fresh herbs. Green goddess is a thick dressing, better tossed with a sturdy green or used as a dip for fresh veggies. Fresh and delightful on grilled fish, it also can be tossed with pasta, used as a marinade for chicken and spread in a pocket for a veggie sandwich.

Preparing green goddess dressing is a snap in a food processor or blender. This recipe, adapted from one by Jessica Battilana (another San Francisco-based chef) in her book “Repertoire,” uses jarred mayonnaise, yogurt, and lots of fresh herbs: parsley, basil, tarragon and chives.

Because it’s too early to be snipping the basil is the greenhouse, I substituted a fresh Basil Ricotta crafted by Crooked Face Creamery of Norridgewalk for the one-third cup yogurt and one-half cup basil leaves. I’ve also added dill weed to the chopped herb mix; fresh thyme, mint leaves — even rosemary sprigs — to enliven this savory dip.

The key to the flavor is finding the balance between the richness of the mayonnaise and yogurt, the springy green of fresh herbs, the acidity and the salt. Taste, adjust your seasonings, and taste again. Enjoy the flavorsome health benefits of going spring green.

Green Goddess Dressing
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Food historians credit the origin of this dressing to San Francisco’s Palace Hotel, where chef Philip Roemer created it to honor actor George Arliss, who was performing in William Archer’s 1923 play “The Green Goddess.” The dressing is bright green (as is the huge green idol in the play), creamy, rich and tangy … addictive really.
Green Goddess Dressing
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Food historians credit the origin of this dressing to San Francisco’s Palace Hotel, where chef Philip Roemer created it to honor actor George Arliss, who was performing in William Archer’s 1923 play “The Green Goddess.” The dressing is bright green (as is the huge green idol in the play), creamy, rich and tangy … addictive really.
Ingredients
  • ½ cup good quality mayonnaise
  • ½ cup Crooked Face Creamery basil ricotta (or 1/3 cup plain full-fat yogurt and ½ cup basil leaves)
  • 3 Tbsps. lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove finely chopped
  • 2 oil-packed anchovy fillets
  • ½ cup parsley leaves
  • 2 Tbsps. finely chopped fresh tarragon or dill weed
  • 3 Tbsps. minced fresh chives or green onions
  • Sea salt and fresh pepper to taste
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of your food processor or blender, combine the mayonnaise, basil ricotta, lemon juice, chopped garlic, anchovies, and parsley leaves. Process until smooth and uniformly green. Scrape into a bowl.
  2. Finely chop the remaining fresh herbs.
  3. Stir the herbs into the mixture. Season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper.
  4. Serve as a dip for crudité (sliced whole or raw vegetables) or as a dressing for salad.
Recipe Notes

Nutritional analysis per tablespoon: 71 calories, less than 1 gram protein, 2 grams carbohydrates, 7 grams fat, 150 mg. sodium, less than 1 gram fiber.

Share this Recipe
Cheryl Wixson
"Maine Dish" columnist Cheryl Wixson lives and cooks in Stonington. Her passion for organic Maine products led to the creation of her business, Cheryl Wixson's Kitchen. She welcomes food-related questions and comments at [email protected] or www.cherylwixsonskitchen.com.
Cheryl Wixson

Latest posts by Cheryl Wixson (see all)