Southwest Harbor filmmaker Thom Willey is currently documenting the Adams School’s Calvineers. The middle school group is led by science teacher and whale researcher Bill McWeeny. Named for a female right whale called Calvin, the group is studying right whales and interacting with marine scientists and legislators about the endangered marine mammal’s survival. PHOTO COURTESY THOM WILLEY

Grants enable sculptor, filmmaker to pursue new projects



AUGUSTA — The sea, land, harbors and weathered structures in and around Stonington continue to fire the imagination of sculptor Lynn Duryea, who earlier this month was awarded a $5,000 Maine Artist Fellowship Award by the Maine Arts Commission.

Duryea, who divides her time between Deer Isle and South Portland, will soon embark on a project to create a body of work for a curated group show, “Darkness and the Light,” next summer at Maine College of Art’s Institute of Contemporary Art.

Ceramic sculptor Lynn Duryea at work at Sawyer Street Studios in South Portland.
MDWPHOTOGRAPHIC PHOTO BY MICHAEL D. WILSON

Abandoned sites of human activity and the processes of decay, erosion weathering and wearing away of surfaces have inspired many of her sculptural ceramic pieces resembling worn welded seams and other vestiges of marine and industrial structures.

“The representation of function is in an allusive and enigmatic sense, suggestive of the past,” Duryea writes in her artist’s statement. “The objects are evocative of abandoned sites of human activity, generating feelings of melancholy and quiet.”

From Southwest Harbor, cameraman and filmmaker Thom Willey also was among the seven 2019 Maine Artist Fellowship recipients. He has been a member and camera assistant of the American Cinematographers Guild since 1993. His films include “My Camera Is My Sketchbook,” a profile of America’s foremost photorealist painter Richard Estes, and “Rhythms of the Heart, a documentary about the late Passamaquoddy canoe and basket maker David Moses Bridges, who strived to preserve Wabanaki culture and protect environmental rights of Native Americans in Maine.

Willey said the $5,000 fellowship came as a “most wonderful surprise” and will enable him to update his photographic equipment for future projects.

 

 

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