lifestyle

  • Raise a glass to “Ruby Juice”

    Raise a glass to “Ruby Juice”

      Our slow, cool spring produced a bumper crop of rhubarb for many folks. Although usually eaten as a “fruit,” rhubarb is a vegetable, botanically speaking. An invaluable homestead plant in Maine, this tart- tasting member of the buckwheat family can reach up to 2 feet tall. I’m a collector of rhubarb recipes, and we’ve

  • May Is for all Maine moms

    May Is for all Maine moms

    Editor’s note: Brooklin author/photographer Richard J. Leighton creates the popular “In the Right Place” posts online about life and nature in Maine. He shares a post the second Thursday of each month in The Ellsworth American. By Richard Leighton May is famous in this country for Mother’s Day. In the larger world, May also is

  • Versatile vinaigrette for salads, marinades

    Ron Fortier of Ellsworth recently wrote to me, “With the present stay-at-home situation, I have been delegated as chief cook. I’m rapidly running out of comfort food ideas,” he said. “Please, if you have any fresh ideas, please share, lest I am forced to eat them lobstah. Don’t want to take them away from the

  • Cancer patients fight back with food

    Cancer patients fight back with food

    ELLSWORTH — If there’s a silver lining to undergoing chemo or radiation treatment it might be this: milkshakes are encouraged. “We try to get as much calories and protein per swallow, basically, as we can get into people,” said Donna Walsh, an oncology nutrition specialist who works at the Harold Alfond Center for Cancer Care

  • Wreath maker sets high bar for its creations

    Wreath maker sets high bar for its creations

      ELLSWORTH – The holidays are a time to look forward to favorite traditions. For some, it’s decorating a Christmas tree with old ornaments made in the second grade, digging out an heirloom gingerbread recipe or hanging a freshly made wreath, decorated with treasures gathered from Maine’s forests, on the front door. Michael and Mandi

  • Usher in season with asparagus soup

    Usher in season with asparagus soup

    Asparagus was brought to America by European settlers sometime in the 18th century. Abigail Adams, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson all learned to appreciate asparagus and grew it on their home farms. In the first American cookbook, published in 1796, Amelia Simmons calls asparagus “an excellent vegetable” and wisely cautions against overcooking it: “by over-boiling

  • A treasured cookbook

    A treasured cookbook

    When I visit my cookbook assortment seeking culinary inspiration, the nearly 100-year-old Girl Scout chant sung around the campfire, “Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver and the other gold,” reminds me that when it comes to practical matters in the kitchen, old friends still have a lot to offer. One of