Articles by: Anne Kozak

Anne Kozak

Contributer at Mount Desert Islander
Anne teaches writing at the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor.
  • Gifts fund Acadia’s Trails Forever

    In July 1999, then-Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt announced a second public-private partnership, one he called a landmark initiative – a $13 million project to restore and reopen hiking trails in Acadia National Park. Like the carriage roads, many of these had not been well maintained because of a lack of funds and staff.

  • Acadia’s ‘Friends’ steadfast for 30 years

    Acadia’s ‘Friends’ steadfast for 30 years

    BAR HARBOR — While the needs Friends of Acadia (FOA) addressed in its first 25 years involved successful and compelling initiatives – the Island Explorer, Carriage Road Restoration project and Acadia Trials Forever – the challenges now are less tangible and more societal, said FOA president David MacDonald. Today FOA, Acadia National Park and its

  • Carriage roads opened up Acadia’s interior

    Carriage roads opened up Acadia’s interior

    In her book “Mr. Rockefeller’s Roads,” Ann Roberts Rockefeller called the collaboration between her grandfather and Acadia co-founder George B. Dorr “remarkable.” Each,” she wrote, “played a critical role in the development of Acadia National Park and the carriage roads, and neither could have succeeded alone. Dorr provided the political skills to complement Rockefeller’s money,

  • Acadia: A gift to the people, by the people

    Acadia: A gift to the people, by the people

    July 8, 2016, marks Acadia National Park’s 100th birthday. But unlike parks in the West that were carved out of existing federal lands, Acadia was given to the nation tract by tract, acre by acre, by many different people over time. Initially, gifts of land came from wealthy summer residents who had a desire both

  • Hemlock pest advancing

    ACADIA NAT’L PARK — After a report of a confirmed sighting of the wooly adelgid in Camden late last week, park officials are asking residents to be on the lookout for the small aphid-like insect. Once an infestation takes hold, the pests can decimate an area’s hemlock trees.

  • Senator joins celebration of $18.4-million grant

    BAR HARBOR — U.S. Senator Susan Collins joined scientists, students and leader of colleges and research institutions in Maine in celebrating an $18.4 million, five-year grant to Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  • Senator joins celebration of $18.4-million grant

    BAR HARBOR — U.S. Senator Susan Collins joined scientists, students and leader of colleges and research institutions in Maine in celebrating an $18.4 million, five-year grant to Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  • Gardens support nonprofits

    MOUNT DESERT — All profits from the Garden Club of Mount Desert’s biannual Open Garden Day support a number of nonprofits, said club president Elly Andrews.

  • ‘Sparta’ tallies full cost of war

    ‘Sparta’ tallies full cost of war

    MOUNT DESERT—A front-page article in the New York Times in August 2008 so incensed author Roxana Robinson that she decided to write her latest novel, “Sparta.” The article described the traumatic injuries troops in Iraq suffered in explosions caused by improvised explosive devices (IED). Not only is the kind of warfare that took place in

  • Acadia to delay tour bus rules

    ACADIA NATIONAL PARK — A concern that the park was unfairly hurting tour bus operators has prompted superintendent Sheridan Steele to place a moratorium on new bus management policies at Thunder Hole, Jordan Pond House, and the Cadillac Mountain Road and summit. On busy days the number of buses and park visitors at the summit

  • Beetle poses threat to Acadia’s ash trees

    Beetle poses threat to Acadia’s ash trees

    ACADIA NATIONAL PARK — The emerald ash borer, a pest that has the potential to wipe out all ash trees, is a looming threat to Mount Desert Island’s forests. This pest potentially can destroy more forests than chestnut blight and the Dutch elm disease, said park resource management specialist Judy Hazen Connery. State and national