Northeast Historic Film’s Executive Director Brook Minner helps celebrate the nonprofit’s past 30 years while looking ahead to its future. She was hired last year as the nonprofit’s first director outside of its two original founders, David Weiss and Karan Sheldon. “I’m working on moving into our next generation,” said Minner. That includes spreading NHF’s mission beyond Bucksport. PHOTO BY TAYLOR BIGLER

Northeast Historic Film looks to the future



BUCKSPORT — It’s a big year at 85 Main St. in Bucksport, with the Alamo Theatre celebrating 100 years and Northeast Historic Film (NHF) turning 30.

To celebrate the centennial, NHF is hosting “A Century of Movies at the Alamo.” The film series will showcase a significant film from each decade of the theater’s existence, from the silent movie era to the Coen brothers.

With that series feting the building’s 100th birthday, an upcoming symposium and film festival will mark 30 years of the film archive.

The past three decades of NHF have been integral to the art of preserving moving images. Now, Executive Director Brook Minner is looking to its future.

In 2015, Minner was hired as the first executive director outside of its two founders, Karan Sheldon and David Weiss.

Since last year, Minner has worked to expand NHF’s profile beyond Bucksport.

“I’m working on moving into our next generation,” Minner said.

Film festivals, movie screenings and new partnerships are some of the ways that NHF is boosting its presence.

This July, NHF will host its 16th annual symposium, which brings together archivists, film scholars and artists.

“Screening New England: 100 Years of Regional Moving Images” is this summer’s topic, which will be held July 21-24, coinciding with the Bucksport Bay Festival.

On July 21, the public is invited to a preview of the “best of” NHF’s collection, which will be shown that night at the Alamo Theatre.

New this year is the inaugural International Maritime Film Festival, hosted by NHF and WoodenBoat Publications Inc., which will be held in Bucksport and Brooklin.

From Sept. 30 to Oct. 2, movie lovers will screen maritime-themed short and feature-length documentaries.

Minner said filmmakers have submitted works from all over the world, which range in topic from boatbuilding, sailing, fishing, leisure, working, history and environment.

The submissions will be judged by a jury and chosen submissions will be screened during the festival.

There also will be an audience favorite selection to be announced at the end of the festival.

Film screenings will take place at the Alamo and a lobster bake at WoodenBoat in Brooklin is set for the night of Oct. 1. Tickets for three days of film screenings, lunch on Saturday, the lobster bake and transportation to WoodenBoat are $150 and can be purchased at www.maritimefilmfest.com.

Also this fall, NHF will celebrate the publication of an educational text that Sheldon co-edited titled, “Amateur Moviemaking: Aesthetics of the Everyday in New England Film, 1915-1960.”

“The book will be interspersed with recollections of people who are actually in the movies,” Minner said. It will be used in college film courses.

NHF also has forged a partnership with the Maine Historical Society in Portland. Starting this fall, Minner will present films from the NHF vault each month throughout the winter.

Minner says that NHF will host screenings in other towns by showing movies from those towns.

NHF recently hosted a pop-up event in Bangor in which it screened films made in that city, and did the same at last month’s Sanford International Film Festival.

Minner said since NHF relies on membership support, it is important to raise its profile as much as possible so it can keep doing what it does.

“Once people see what we have and learn about what we do, it’s kind of an easy sell,” Minner said. “Then we are able to expand our footprint.”

A Century of Movies at the Alamo

To celebrate the Alamo Theatre’s centennial, this yearlong series showcases films from each decade of the building’s existence.

March 20: “Sherlock Holmes” (1916)

April 17: “Wings” (1927)

May 15: “The Wizard of Oz” (1939)

June 19: “Leave Her to Heaven” (1945)

July 17: Hitchcock Double Feature: “Vertigo” (1958) and “Rear Window” (1954)

Aug. 21: “The Sound of Music” (1965)

Sept. 18: “Young Frankenstein” (1974)

Oct. 16: “Big” (1988)

Nov. 20: “Fargo” (1996)